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The Best Insult Comic Dog of 2021

  Updated on 16 October, 2021

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SaleBestseller No. 1
Late Night with Conan O'Brien - The Best of Triumph the...
  • Triumph: Best Of
  • Jeff Richmond (II), Shawn O'Toole, Neil Maloney (Actors)
  • Dana Calderwood (Director)
  • Spanish (Subtitle)
Bestseller No. 2
Late Night With Conan O'Brien: The Best Of Triumph The...
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Justin Timberlake, Christina Aguilera, Heather Locklear (Actors)
  • Robert Smigel (Director) - Jordan Schlansky (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
Bestseller No. 3
Come Poop with Me (CD & DVD)
  • Audio CD – Audiobook
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)
  • Warner Bros. (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 4
Let's Make a Poop! With Triumph the Insult Comic Dog
  • Robert Smigel Team Coco Starburns Audio LLC (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
Bestseller No. 5

Buyer's Guide: Insult Comic Dog

Insult Comic Dog

Triumph the Insult Comic Dog is an animated dog who stands up in defense of the people he represents. He is voiced by Tigard resident voice artist John DiMaggio. His best friend is a pink Poodle named Valentine. Triumph the Insult Comic Dog also had a cool lunch date with The Real Housewives of Atlanta's reality show's bad girl, iced coffee. It was supposed to be a good-natured fun day out for the two furry friends. What they got instead was an experience that will be cherished for the ages.

A popular sketch on the comedy central TV show, The Daily Show, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog made his debut in the fifth season. As the name suggests, he makes fun of those in the comedy central business world, often using exaggerated speech patterns and insults to get his point across. Many fans consider him to be the show's main competitor to Correspondent Bob Newhart. The two do not often interact except on special occasions like the puppet awards show. The two do however share a close relationship, often spending time together during long nights on the town.

Insult Comic Dog made his first appearance on the presidential campaign trail in the third episode of the fourth season, which was titled "The Donald Trump Show." He made an extended speech about the need for a big government and how he would give the government everything they needed in order to run smoothly. The real estate developer made several outrageous and tasteless comments about Senator John McCain and President Bush, at one point calling both of them "piece of garbage." In the end, the crowd loved it, and Trump was declared the winner of the most controversial skit of the entire campaign.

Two days later, in the election special's final episode, Trump hosted a press conference where he took questions from reporters posing questions about the political situation he found himself in after winning the election. One question asked if he had considered using a poop bag on the stage as a podium. Trump replied by holding up his bag of "doo-doo," a reference to his campaign catch phrase. It is unclear what happened to that particular item. However, the puppet did appear on a few other occasions throughout the year.

One of the most well-known instances of the Insult Comic Dog occurs in "The Late Night Show" on CBS. After host Craig Kiloby announced a drawing for the new year, he invited a couple of his guests to come on the show to "puppy the pig." There were quite a few people who showed up with their own Poodles, and so the late night host decided that he would reward these individuals with a new pet of their own. One of the dogs was the Insult Comic Dog, and when the pig came out, he began to bark and shake. The audience began to laugh, and then Craig responded by asking, "How do you keep that pooch from shaking his tail?" The puppet answered in a rictusque growl, and followed by a big stick of a tail.

Following a number of unsuccessful attempts to get the black wolf to stop his terrible barking, Craig Kiloby gave up and asked the crowd to give him a chance to clean up his mess. Several people threw poop at the wolf, but he ignored them. A couple of women even went so far as to place black eggs on the stage in an attempt to train the Insult Comic Dog to poop at real things. Fortunately, there were some audience members who thought this was a good idea, and they quickly gathered all the black eggs they could find and scattered them all over the studio floor. Then, The Late Night Show host offered up his prize to the winner of his new game, and the winner received a "Porky Pantry." The Insult Comic Dog made quite a impression throughout the year on both left and right.

It wasn't until the presidential campaign that Kiloby's puppet was used for the first time as a political attack ad against Democratic nominee John Kennedy. On the very first episode, a man dressed in drag (complete with a stiletto heeled pad) accosted the Democratic presidential candidate while he was in a store shopping for milk. The famous "You're not the president of America" bit, which had been a favorite of bothedy and conservative comedy writers alike since the first presidential debate in CBS was aired, made it into a major television campaign special.

Today, there are several charity organizations that use the "You're Not the President of America" format as a fundraising campaign against political campaigns and other civic organizations. There is even a web site, which now boasts over three-thousand appearances by Kiloby's fake pooch, and which is updated daily. And even if The President didn't make a reference to President Obama during his speech to the Democratic National Convention, it was likely that several other politicians and celebrities, some of whom have large followings on the internet, would have done so on their social networking profiles, or in any other venues available to them.